Stanford University - Stanford Center for Professional Development

Innovation Masters Series  |   December 10-12, 2014

Request Info Register Now

Innovation Masters Series

Design Thinking and the Art of Innovation

Stanford University, December 10-12, 2014

For three days, Stanford will open up its design labs and classrooms to executives, business leaders, and decision makers faced with the daunting task of retooling and revitalizing their enterprises.

Senior faculty will lead you through hands-on workshops where you will learn the problem-solving tools and problem-finding frameworks that lead to innovation and strategic leadership, pioneered by the Design Group and the d.school at Stanford.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Learn a methodology that makes innovation routine
  • Learn problem-finding and reframing techniques that enable innovation
  • Learn how to build and nurture radical collaboration
  • Develop the skills needed to lead brainstorming and innovation practices
  • Unleash the power of prototyping to ask new questions and drive innovation
  • Build connections with senior Stanford faculty and with fellow participants

Learn more

Post-It Notes design on wall

"The global economic crisis has fundamentally reset the way companies do business and capitalism itself..."

Jeff Imelt
CEO of GE at the 2009 Annual Meeting

Introduction

In today's business environment, companies are challenged to implement more projects with fewer resources. New products are being rushed to market to stave off collapsing margins, and many markets are bombarded by copy-cat foreign companies and nimble competitors with radically lower cost structures. Jeff Immelt was right - everything has changed and this is the "new normal". How you differentiate between the urgent and the important, navigate today's innovation crisis, and strategize for tomorrow's business challenges will impact the long-term success of your company.

Learn how to gain a competitive edge by joining us on the Stanford campus December 10-12, 2014, for Stanford's Innovation Masters Series, sponsored by the Stanford School of Engineering, the Stanford Design Group, and the Design Program.

Design Thinking for Business Leaders

For three days, Stanford will open up its design labs and classrooms to executives, business leaders, and decision makers faced with the daunting task of retooling and revitalizing their enterprises. Senior faculty will lead you through hands-on workshops where you will learn the problem-solving tools and problem-finding frameworks that lead to innovation and strategic leadership, pioneered by the Design Group and the d.school at Stanford. Visual Thinking, Conceptual Block-Busting, User-Centered Design, and User-Driven Innovation are not just tools for designers but can be harnessed by business leaders to transform their organizations. Recognized as a driver of innovation, "Design Thinking" will teach you a methodology for incorporating innovation into your everyday business practices.

Many of the faculty presenting are part of the renowned and radical d.school, officially known as the Hasso Platner Institute of Design at Stanford, where Design Thinking is used to solve complex business problems that do not yield easily to other analytic methods. The d.school is at the forefront of an international trend to integrate design, technology and business practices to train tomorrow's leaders.

The old business adage "If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always got..." has never been more true. Because of this, the Stanford methodology recognizes that more efficient problem solving is only a small part of an effective innovation strategy and instead focuses on processes that lead to more exciting and radical problem finding. Come to Stanford in December 2014 and work with our senior design faculty to learn how to make empathy, the best way to find the important problems, a central part of your innovation toolkit.

Our Approach:
Radical Collaboration – before, during and after

Our executive seminar provides an intensive hands-on experience using problem-based learning and radical collaboration – everyone plays. You will work on teams on projects that will simulate the kinds of problems and impossible tasks you face every day.

But radical collaboration doesn't just start when you arrive on campus. Participants will have access to the faculty through a Linked-In social network as well as through "Needfinding Webinars" and pre-program surveys designed to provoke a dialog about the real-world problems you face in your industry. This conversation will be used as a real-time curriculum development tool and will focus the program on problems you care about. During the program you will work one-on-one with senior faculty, and you can elect to stay connected to fellow participants and the faculty after completion of the program through our social network.

Since it is often true that the value of these programs lies equally in the amazing people you meet while on campus, before, during and after the program you will be collaborating and creating with your new colleagues - an important advantage when you go home to tackle the insurmountable.

  1. 00Home
  2. 01Introduction
  3. 02Who Should Attend
  4. 03Faculty
  5. 04Curriculum / Schedule
  6. 05Tuition / Registration
  7. 06Location / Facilities
David Kelley

"We believe the next generation innovators and leaders need to be great design thinkers."

David Kelley
Stanford Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director, the d.school (the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design) and the founder of IDEO, the world's preeminent design consultancy

Product Realization Lab

"The most successful businesses in the years to come will balance analytic mastery and intuitive originality in a dynamic interplay ... called design thinking"

from the book, The Design of Business, by Roger Martin, Dean of the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Who Should Attend

From our past experience, we believe that the following individuals would most benefit from this program:

  • Executives and senior leaders in charge of business units
  • Decision-makers in R&D for product or service industries
  • Innovation leaders responsible for value creation
  • Leaders and their team embroiled in turn-around situations
  • "Skunk works" and strategic project teams

To maximize the opportunity for learning and successful organizational implementation, we encourage executives and leaders to bring their teams – those responsible for generating impact – and attend the program together.

  • David Beach

    David Beach

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Director of the Product Realization Laboratory and Co-Chair of the Product Realization Network at Stanford

  • Bill Burnett

    Bill Burnett

    Consulting Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Executive Director of the Stanford Design Program

  • Ed Carryer

    Ed Carryer

    Consulting Professor, Mechanical Engineering Design Group

  • Mark Cutkosky

    Mark Cutkosky

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Co-Director of the Center for Design Research

  • David Kelley

    David Kelley

    Donald W. Whittier Professor of Mechanical Engineering; founder of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford, and founder of IDEO

  • Larry Leifer

    Larry Leifer

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group, Director, Center for Design Research; Director, Industry Affiliate Program for Teaching Design Thinking

  • Paul Mitiguy

    Paul Mitiguy

    Consulting Professor, Mechanical Engineering Design Group

  • Allison Okamura

    Allison Okamura

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Principal Investigator, Collaborative Haptics And Robotics in Medicine (CHARM) Laboratory

  • Bernie Roth

    Bernie Roth

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Academic Director of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford

  • Sheri Sheppard

    Sheri Sheppard

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Co-Director of the Center for Design Research

Faculty

For over 40 years the Design Group at Stanford University has been studying and solving impossible problems; designing robot hands that can "feel", creating bikes out of paper, building mechanical geckos that can climb walls, and cars that drive-by-wire and without humans. In the process Stanford faculty have invented and codified powerful problem solving methods that focus on: finding the right problem and doing the thing right. These techniques have proven successful in business by our alumni (and faculty), who have founded such companies as IDEO and created such products as the original Mac computer.

  • David Beach

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Director of the Product Realization Laboratory and Co-Chair of the Product Realization Network at Stanford

    Born the descendant of teachers, professors, tool & die makers and mill owners, it was inevitable that Dave Beach would teach a combination of design & manufacturing. The son of a painter/museum director, he celebrates aesthetics and human values in design. In 1972 Dave accepted an offer to embrace what turned out to be the most satisfying calling in the world: helping Stanford students to physically create the products of their imagination, calculation, inspiration and teamwork. As a teacher, Dave trusts his students and intends that they will find work that is important and interesting to them, learn how to discover information that will advance that work, respect the power of others who offer wisdom and experience beyond the student's personal experience, take responsibility for the consequences of their creative decisions, and gain confidence that they can change the world. Dave believes that tacit knowledge, the judgment and instinct born of designing and building things, combines with traditional engineering education to graduate creators of new things in life. As Director of the Product Realization Laboratory and co-Director of the Stanford Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing, Dave brings creativity in teaching, experience with design and manufacturing processes, and a respect for learning to everything he does at Stanford.

  • Bill Burnett

    Consulting Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Executive Director of the Stanford Design Program

    After years of drawing cars and airplanes under his Grandmother's sewing machine, Bill Burnett went off to the University and discovered, much to his surprise, that there were people in the world who did this kind of thing everyday (without the sewing machine) and they were called designers. Thirty years, five companies, and a couple of thousand students later Bill is still drawing and building things, teaching others how to do the same, and quietly enjoying the fact that no one has discovered that he is having too much fun. Bill is the Executive Director of the Design Program and manages the undergraduate and graduate program in design at Stanford, both joint programs between the Mechanical Engineering and the Art. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Product Design at Stanford and has worked professionally on a wide variety of projects ranging from award-winning Apple portable computers to the original Hasbro Star Wars action figures. He holds a number of mechanical and design patents and design awards for a variety of products including the first "slate" computer. In addition to his duties at Stanford, he serves as a board member of D2M, a product design consultancy, Dalson Energy, an alternative energy company focused on developing biomass gasification energy systems for small-scale municipalities, and advises several Internet start-up companies on design strategy.

  • Ed Carryer

    Consulting Professor, Mechanical Engineering Design Group

    Ed Carryer is the Director of the Smart Product Design Laboratory (SPDL) in the Design Division of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He is currently a Consulting Associate Professor in the Design Division of Mechanical Engineering. He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1992. Prior to that, he received an M.S. in Bio-Medical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1978. Ed's B.S.E. was awarded from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1975, where he was a member (1/3) of the first graduating class of the Education and Experience in Engineering (E 3)program.

    Ed's industrial experience varies wildly, from designing water treatment facilities for coal and nuclear power plants for Sargent & Lundy to designing the electronic controller for an Arctic Heated Glove under contract to NASA. He spent eight years in the Detroit area working in and about the auto industry. During that time he worked for Ford, GM and AMC on electronic engine control systems, predominantly for turbo-charged engines. He has an active design consultancy that has tackled such varied projects as an engine controller for an outboard motor manufacturer, an automated blood gas analyzer, and a turbo-charger boost control system for a new type of turbo-charger.

  • Mark Cutkosky

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Co-Director of the Center for Design Research

    Mark takes his inspiration for the design of robots from nature; his lab is the one that has designed and built a robot, styled after a gecko, that can climb up walls without leaving a trace. He runs Stanford's Biomimetics and Dexterous Manipulation Laboratory where he explores various aspects of robotics that can lead to autonomous biomimetic "creatures" and applications in advanced manufacturing systems. The lab designs and produces robotic hands, tactile sensors, and force-feedback devices for use in human-computer interactions. Other applications include small, biologically inspired robots with embedded sensors, actuators, and controllers hat push the boundaries of biologically-derived design and autonomy. In manufacturing, his work focuses on design tools for rapid prototyping. Mark got his PhD from Carnegie Mellon and has been at Stanford since 1986.

  • David Kelley

    Donald W. Whittier Professor of Mechanical Engineering; founder of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford, and founder of IDEO

    David Kelley's EE degree from CMU landed him in the engineering departments of NCR and Boeing, where he eventually discovered that the rigid world of corporate design was not for him. Through a friend, he learned about Stanford's Joint Program in Design, and happily returned to school. After earning his master's in 1978 he started his own design firm, vowing to only work on cool projects with people he liked. The company he founded became IDEO, a worldwide leader in the user-centered design of products, services, and environments. IDEO is recognized as much for its process and culture as for its work. In May 2004 a Business Week cover article, "The Power of Design," profiled IDEO and its work helping companies change the way they innovate. David began teaching design at Stanford in 1978, and became a tenured professor in 1991. David now heads Stanford's d.school, and he is on a mission to add "design thinking" to Stanford's existing competence of teaching analytical thinking. This will result in students who create delightful design experiences and embrace and promote a culture of innovation

  • Larry Leifer

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group, Director, Center for Design Research; Director, Industry Affiliate Program for Teaching Design Thinking

    Dr. Leifer's design thinking research is focused on instrumenting, understanding, supporting, and improving design practice through the development of design theory. Specific issues include: design research methodology, global team dynamics, innovation leadership, interactive interaction spaces, design-for-wellbeing, and adaptive mechatronic systems.

  • Paul Mitiguy

    Consulting Professor, Mechanical Engineering Design Group

    Paul completed his bachelor's degree at Tufts University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. Since 1990, Paul has been developing motion simulation software, including the symbolic manipulator Autolev, Interactive Physics, Working Model, MSC.visualNastran 4D, software for the NIH, and MotionGenesis. Paul's projects include Space-systems work at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory, flight dynamics at NASA Ames, and software and business development at MSC.Software. At Stanford, Paul teaches mechanics, dynamic systems, classical and advanced dynamics, and publishes journal articles and textbooks. He currently works as Consulting Vice-President for Design-Simulation Technologies and consults for alternative energy and transportation companies. Paul believes K-12 is the battleground for future advancements in technology and provides in-service teacher training in conjunction with with NASA Langley and the American Association of Physics Teachers.

  • Allison Okamura

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Principal Investigator, Collaborative Haptics And Robotics in Medicine (CHARM) Laboratory

    Allison Okamura's research focuses on developing the principles and tools needed to realize advanced robotic and human-machine systems capable of haptic (touch) interaction, particularly for biomedical applications. Haptic systems are designed and studied using both analytical and experimental approaches. Topics of particular interest are: (1) Teleoperation: Devices, models, and control systems that allow human operators to manipulate environments that are remote in scale and/or distance. (2) Virtual Environments: Models, control systems, and devices that enable compelling touch-based interaction with computers. (3) Robotic manipulation: Robots that physically manipulate their environment or their own shape, incorporating novel designs, sensors, and control systems. Application areas include surgery, simulation and training, rehabilitation, prosthetics, neuromechanics, exploration of hazardous and remote environments, design, and education.

  • Bernie Roth

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Academic Director of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford

    Bernie Roth is a longtime veteran of the Stanford design community. He first came to the Stanford Design Division faculty in 1962. Bernie brings to the d.school a wealth of experience in teaching design and a worldwide reputation as a researcher in kinematics and robotics. Together with Doug Wilde and the late Rolf Faste, Bernie developed the concept of a Creativity Workshop, a curriculum he has delivered to executives, professional, and students and faculty all over the world for 30 years. These same concepts and techniques are now a core part of the d.school curriculum. It is Bernie's experience that these learning experiences enhance students' ability to make meaningful positive difference in their own lives. He is especially interested in creating environments where people can get the tools and values for realizing the enduring satisfactions that come from assisting others in the human community.

  • Sheri Sheppard

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Design Group; Co-Director of the Center for Design Research

    Sheri Sheppard Ph.D., P.E., is the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Consulting Senior Scholar principally responsible for the Preparations for the Professions Program (PPP) engineering study, the results of which are in the report Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field. In addition, she is professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. Besides teaching both undergraduate and graduate design-related classes at Stanford University, she conducts research on the development of academic and career interests and aspirations of college students and early career professionals. She recently completed a five-year NSF-funded project called the Academic Pathways Study (APS). As part of this study the educational and career experiences of the Millenial generation were explored through interviews and surveys. Findings about what motivates this generation and how they conceive their future career plans have implications the academy, for industry and for career counseling for how to best support this generation as they work to define their places in the world.

FPO

"...we need to invent a new and radical form of collaboration... it's not about 'us verses them' or even 'us on behalf of them'. For the design thinker, it has to be 'us with them'."

from Change by Design, by Tim Brown, CEO and President of IDEO

Curriculum / Schedule

Highlighted Session | Tours and Lab Visits | Sample Schedule

Highlighted Sessions - Subject to Change

David Kelley – David has been recognized as one of America's leading design innovators through his membership with the National Academy of Engineering, as well as the Chrysler Design Award and National Design Award in Product Design from the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. At Stanford University, he is the Donald W. Whittier Chaired Professor in the school's innovative Product Design program and creator of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design, also known as the "d.school." Preparing the design thinkers of tomorrow earned David the Sir Misha Black Medal for his "distinguished contribution to design education." David has also won the Edison Achievement Award for Innovation.

Tours and Lab Visits

The tour schedule is subject to lab safety requirements and availability.

CARS (the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford)

Join us at the CARS facility and see the prototype cars that are setting records, winning DARPA challenges, and creating the future of the automobile. Live demonstrations of the P1 and X1 prototypes (subject to safety requirements and vehicle availability) and a chance to mingle with the faculty from this ground breaking research center.

IDEO tour

Join us for a tour of the main corporate offices of IDEO, the premier design strategy and innovation firm in the world. We will go behind the scenes and visit the projects team rooms, workshops, and brainstorming labs to get a feel for how innovation happens at IDEO.

Smart Products Design Labs (SPDL) tour

Come see the lab where we create smart products with microprocessors, motors, sensors and actuators, and research how mechatronics will impact the products of the future. You will have an opportunity to see demonstrations of robots that play games and battlebots that fight to the death and to meet the faculty of this important lab.

StickyBot climbing window

Biomimetics and Dexterous Manipulation Lab and MERL (the Mechanical Engineering Research lab)

This is the lab that has produce the amazing StickyBot, the robot that climbs walls like a Gecko. Visitors to this lab will meet StickyBot and other climbing, running and flying robots, based on the principals of biomimicry. Located inside MERL, the home of many of the innovation labs on campus, the Biomimetics Lab's research is funded by the Office of Naval Research and others.

The Product Realization Lab (PRL) and the Design Loft

The PRL and Loft surround the Design courtyard and, with the addition of the Peterson Building, form the center of design related activities at Stanford. The PRL contains everything needed to design, prototype and create innovative design concepts, including all the traditional fabrication machinery in addition to state-of-the-art computer-aided drawing, manufacturing, and prototyping systems.

Sample Schedule:

Day One: Wednesday
11:30 a.m. Registration Opens and Lunch
1:00 p.m. Introduction
1:45 p.m. The Ideation Tune-up
3:30 p.m. Keynote Speaker: David Kelley on Design Thinking and Creative Confidence
4:30 p.m. The Art of Critique: I Like/I Wish
4:45 p.m. Tour and Reception at IDEO
Day Two: Thursday
8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
9:00 a.m. Keynote Speaker: Bernie Roth - The Question is the Answer
10:30 a.m. Bio-Inspired Design
12:00 p.m. Robotics Lab Tour and Lunch
1:35 p.m. Separate into 2 groups
1:45 p.m. Making Matter or
Radical Collaboration on a Mission
3:45 p.m. Swap groups
4:00 p.m. Making Matter or
Radical Collaboration on a Mission
5:30 p.m. Tour and Reception, CARS Facility Tour and Concept Car Demonstrations
Day Three: Friday
8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
9:00 a.m. Hunting by Design
10:45 a.m. Panel: Design Thinking in the Real World
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Design Based Strategy
2:15 p.m. Wrap Up & Final Thoughts
3:15 p.m. Program End
  1. 00Home
  2. 01Introduction
  3. 02Who Should Attend
  4. 03Faculty
  5. 04Curriculum / Schedule
  6. 05Tuition / Registration
  7. 06Location / Facilities

"To whom does design address itself: to the greatest number, to the specialist of an enlightened matter, to a privileged social class? No – Design addresses itself to the need."

Charles Eames

FPO

"It's not what we don't know that hurts us, it's what we know for sure that just ain't so."

Mark Twain

Tuition / Registration

Program tuition: $7,000

Includes all course materials at the conclusion of the program containing exercises and lecture materials. Breakfast, lunch and networking receptions with faculty also included.

Discounts are provided for early and group registrations as follows:
  • Individual enrollments:
  • $7000 program tuition
  • $6000 before September 30, 2014
  • Group enrollments before
    September 30, 2014:
  • Team of three: $17,000 (discount $4000)
  • Team of five: $28,000 (discount $7000)

REGISTER NOW

Additional Information

Please contact
SCPD Customer Service
650-204-3984
scpd-customerservice@stanford.edu

  1. 00Home
  2. 01Introduction
  3. 02Who Should Attend
  4. 03Faculty
  5. 04Curriculum / Schedule
  6. 05Tuition / Registration
  7. 06Location / Facilities

"You can't dig a new hole by digging the same one deeper."

Edward de Bono

Aerial view of Stanford University

Location / Facilities

The program is held on the Stanford University campus, which is situated on 8,180 acres in the rolling foothills. Located 35 miles south of San Francisco, Stanford University is just a few miles from Palo Alto and the high-tech industrial center of Silicon Valley. The campus is 25 miles south of San Francisco International Airport and 20 miles north of San Jose International Airport.

Stanford has many amenities located nearby. A large shopping center and Palo Alto's commercial district are only a mile away. Music, theater, sports and fine restaurants are available in the communities that surround the campus. Monterey Bay, spectacular portions of the Central California coast, and Napa and Sonoma wine country are all accessible within a few hours of the campus.

VIEW GOOGLE MAP

Map of Stanford University